"Nashville Sputnik - The Deep South/Outer Space Productions of Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan"
Liner Notes by Jack Blanchard
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 1. Strange New World – Artist: Jacqueline Hyde and the Moonfolk. 
 (Steve Fenner/Jack Blanchard) Zodiac Records/ Recorded Criteria Studios, Miami/
 Lead vocal- Misty Morgan as Jacqueline /Label- Zodiac /Organ-Misty Morgan, Lead guitars-
 Doug Tarrant as Doug Wayne/ Rhythm guitar- John Abate/ Drums- Ronny Caban/
 Bass- Jackie Raye/ Back up vocals- Jack & Misty/ Alto flute-unknown/
 Produced & arranged by Jack Blanchard/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI)/ 1965.
Note:
This was Misty’s first solo recording, and Doug Tarrant was the guitarist with our trio. 
They both used aliases on this record. We don’t know why. It’s the spacey sound that 
we had developed on stage. Listening to it now, we hear influences of Les Paul and Mary Ford, 
Toni Fisher, and The Tornados. Jackie Raye, Ronny Caban, and John Abate were well known 
Miami jazz musicians, who played on most of our Florida sessions. Criteria is probably the best 
known studio south of Nashville and Atlanta, and stars record there. There were no synthesizers
then, except maybe the Theremin. Jack Davis, the mastering engineer at Criteria, built the
oscillator that provides the outer space effect at the start of the song, and he was showing it to me...
a black box with knobs. He let me fool around with it and I came up with the sound we used for the record.
One time we were mixing one of our sadder songs when the recording engineer started crying,
said he couldn't take the sad song, and walked out of the building. We think he was a little stoned.

 2. The Lonely Sentry - Artists: Rusty Diamond, with guest star Maryanne Mail. (Steve Fenner/
 Jack Blanchard) Label- Zodiac Records and Starday Records/ recorded Criteria Studios, Miami/ 
 Organ and harmony vocal as Maryanne Mail-Misty Morgan/ Drums- Ronny Caban/ Bass- Jackie              
 Raye/ Rhythm guitar- John Abate/Electric banjo- Henry Cook/ Harmonica- Paul McLaughlin/
 Back up vocals- Jack & Misty/ Produced & arranged by Jack Blanchard/ Pub: Jack Blanchard
 Songs (BMI)/ 1965.
Note:
The lead instrument in this record is an electric pedal banjo, the invention of the great banjo player 
Henry Cook. He had cables going down from his banjo to a row of pedals on the floor, so he could 
get the slide and sustain of a steel guitar and keep the funkiness of the banjo. Paul McLaughlin was 
the sax player who replaced Doug Tarrant in our trio. On this cut Paul plays harmonica. The 
instrumental break features the odd combination of electric pedal banjo, harmonica, and church bells.

 3. We Walked This Road Before - Artist: Brad Wolfe. (J. Blanchard)
 Mercury Studios, Nashville/ Stop Records.
 Lead guitar- Billy Sanford/ Steel- Lloyd Green/ Piano- Hargus Robbins/Rhythm guitar- Bobby Thompson/
 Bass Henry Stzrelecki/ Drums- Larrie Londin/ Harmonica- Charlie McCoy/ Produced & arranged by
 Jack & Misty/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI)/ 1971
Note:
I wish I could tell you where my song ideas come from, but I don't know. In this case I think I just 
wanted to write something about reincarnation.

 4. Time Machine- Artist: Joel Mathis (J. Blanchard)
 Studio- Music City Recorders, Nashville/ (Unreleased)
 Lead guitar- Billy Sanford/ Steel- Lloyd Green/ Piano- Hargus Robbins/Rhythm guitar- Bobby Thompson/
 Bass Henry Stzrelecki/ Drums- Larrie Londin/ String synth and vocal harmony- Misty Morgan/
 Harmonica- Charlie McCoy/ Produced & arranged by Jack & Misty/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI) 1971. 
Note:
Did you ever experience anything like this? Even though I spent very little time with Joel Mathis,
my mind has registered him as a friend. Maybe it's because I've listened to my own song lyrics 
through his voice.
I've listened to him so much, I know his every vocal nuance. Another thing is: He has a friendly
masculine warmth to his voice, like Hoss Cartwright or Bill Mack... the gentle tough guy.
The world lost Joel in 1999 at the age of 52, but his voice and music go on.
If we listen closely, we can hear Misty singing duet harmony with Joel on the choruses. It was inevitable 
that we have a time machine song…just a matter of time.
	
 5. Skellykins - Artist: Rusty Diamond (J. Blanchard)
 Starday Studios, Nashville. Stop Records
 Lead guitar- Jerry Shook/ Steel guitar- Pete Drake/ rhythm guitar- Tommy Hill/Piano- Jerry Smith/
 Bass- Junior Huskey/ Drums- Willy Ackerman/ Backup singers- The Hardin Trio/ Produced & arranged
 by Jack Blanchard/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI)/1966.
Note:
Rusty Diamond was a flamboyant character. In Nashville he once called the best men’s store in town 
and had them bring a truckload of clothes to our motel for us to choose from. Rusty hired cops, crowds 
of women, and limousines to meet us at airports. He over tipped, over talked, and had a talent for 
getting rich girlfriends. He also had a surprising talent in the recording studio. I would coach him before 
each session, and he would go in and make it better than I had laid it out. 

 6. Yellow Bellied Sap Sucker - Artist Hank Malcolm. (J. Blanchard)
 Mercury Studios, Nashville/  Starday Records.
 Lead guitar- Jerry Shook/ Steel guitar- Pete Drake/ rhythm guitar- Tommy Hill/Piano- Jerry Smith/
 Bass- Junior Huskey/ Drums- Willy Ackerman/ Backup singers- The Hardin Trio/ Produced & arranged
 by Jack Blanchard/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI)/1972.
Note:
In the late 1960’s we ran a night club in Orlando and we were the show, But we had bookings on the 
road more and more, so we brought in some talented friends from Miami, hired musicians for backup 
bands, and they took our place when we were out of town. One of them was Hank Malcolm. He 
rehearsed his band until they were tight, brought in his friend Sammi Smith from Nashville to work 
with him, and began to draw good crowds. Of course, this was before Sammi had her monster hit 
“Help Me Make it Through the Night”. We gave Hank the name Big Brad Wolfe. He like “Brad Wolfe”, 
but dropped the “Big”. The air conditioner in the club broke down often, and it quit one Saturday 
afternoon. They had reservations for that evening and expected a big crowd, so Brad drove across 
town, rented two giant fans, and stood them on each side of the stage, aimed toward the audience. 
It saved the night. In the front row there was a fan whooping, and hollering and having a good time. 
Brad says that when he finished a song, the guy rose to give Brad a standing ovation, and the fan 
blew his toupee off.
	
 7. Gemini - Artists: The Jack Blanchard Group. (Jack Blanchard/ Steve Fenner) 
 Label- Zodiac Records/ recorded Criteria Studios, Miami/ 
 Organ-Misty Morgan, Guitars- Doug Tarrant as Doug Wayne/ Rhythm guitar-John Abate/ Drums-
 Ronny Caban/ Bass- Jackie Raye/ Back up vocals- Jack & Misty/ Produced & arranged by Jack
 Blanchard/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI)/ 1965.
Note:
This was our first recording to get noticeable airplay. In Miami, the Pop stations were all playing it 
and we kept our car radio on all the time…on top of the world! Then one afternoon we heard Gemini 
come on and it changed key in the middle. It wasn’t us. It was The Ventures. Their representatives 
contacted us and wanted 100% of the publishing. We were already ticked off about them killing our 
record, and we turned them down. They then flipped the record and promoted the B side. It turned 
out to be La Bamba.

 8. Lonely Bell- Artists: Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan. (J. Blanchard)
 Darn records/ Woodland Studio, Nashville. (Unreleased)
 Lead guitar- Billy Sanford, Steel guitar- Lloyd Green, Piano- Hargus Robbins, Drums- unknown, 
 Acoustic Bass- Junior Huskey, Harmonica & Utility- Charlie McCoy, Other keyboards- Don Tweedy,
 Rhythm guitar- Kelso Hurston, Backup vocals- The Anita Kerr Singers. Produced & arranged by
 Jack & Misty/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI)/ 1967.
Note:
The Anita Kerr Singers were stars in their own right with a number of popular records. Anita authored 
one of the definitive books on writing vocal harmonies. We were lucky to have them on our first Nashville 
sessions.
	
 9. Mary Turn Around - Artist: Hank Malcolm. (J. Blanchard)
 Starday Studios, Nashville/ Starday records. 
 Lead vocal- Brad Wolfe as Hank Malcolm, Lead guitar- Jerry Shook, Steel guitar- Pete Drake,
 rhythm guitar- Tommy Hill, Piano- Jerry Smith, Bass- Junior Huskey, Drums- Willy Ackerman,
 Backup singers- The Hardin Trio. Produced & arranged by Jack Blanchard/ Pub: Jack Blanchard
 Songs (BMI) 1965.
Note:
Our friend Hank Malcolm (not yet Brad Wolfe), asked me to go to Nashville with him to produce this 
recording session. The Interstate Highway didn't go from Florida to Tennessee then, so it was all 
narrow winding mountain roads. When the winter sun went down it turned really cold. That's when 
he broke the news to me that his car didn't have a heater. I wrapped a blanket around myself and 
over my head like a shawl. Hank said I looked like an evil nun. We were happy at how the session 
turned out, and somebody advised us to take it to Ray Stevens. I said "What was that name?", and 
wrote it down. I didn't know who Ray Stevens was, and that was the first thing he didn't like about me. 
The second thing was the black mohair gangster suit I was wearing. I was from Miami. I hadn't learned 
to blend in in Nashville...in fact I never really did. Stevens said he kinda liked the other song from the 
session... "Monkey See Monkey Do", but not enough to put it on his Monument label. We met Ray 
several times later, after we'd had a couple of hits, and he was a good guy, but a lot more serious 
than you would think from hearing his records.

 10. Changin’ Times – Artist: Brad Wolfe. (J. Blanchard)
 Studio: Music City Recorders. Action Records.
 Lead guitar- Billy Sanford, Steel- Lloyd Green, Piano- Hargus Robbins, Rhythm guitar- Bobby Thompson,
 Bass- Henry Stzrelecki, Drums- Larrie Londin, String synth and vocal harmony- Misty Morgan, 
 Harmonica- Charlie McCoy. Produced & arranged by Jack & Misty/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI) 1972.
Note:
This is one of our most requested songs, probably because it’s always current.
Change is the only thing we can depend on, and it can be very annoying. We’ve noticed that time 
goes swiftly on the calendar and slowly on the clock. Look at the clock and time seems to stand still. 
Look away for a minute… it moves all the scenery, and turns children old.

Some thoughts about the equipment and effects of the 1960's...
We sang into Telefunken condenser mikes, we had 3 or 4 track wide tape running then at 15 ips.
We had several kinds of reverb... including elaborate echo chambers. These were highly
engineered, shellacked rooms, with a speaker at one end, and a movable condenser mike on a track.
No two flat surfaces were parallel to each other, to prevent standing waves. They sounded as
good or better than digital echo/verbs, but a lot of conservative producers were afraid of them.

 11. I’m Hung Up On You – Artist: Rusty Diamond, the Country Nut. 
 (J. Blanchard) Zodiac Records, Stop Records.
 Lead guitar- Jerry Shook, Steel guitar- Pete Drake, rhythm guitar- Tommy Hill, Piano- Jerry Smith,
 Bass- Junior Huskey, Drums- Willy Ackerman, Backup singers- The Hardin Trio, Produced & arranged
 by Jack Blanchard,1965. Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI).
Note:
One of Rusty’s backers, a very sweet buxom blonde from Chicago, bought into Rusty's career to the 
tune of $48,000 in one week. Her father heard about it and jumped a plane for Miami to have us all 
arrested, if not killed. Rusty hit the old man for another ten grand. He had a way about him. He also 
had his down times. He rented an expensive beach front apartment and hired a huge bodyguard just 
for ambience. The money ran out, and Rusty was running from the bodyguard he had neglected to pay. 
We ran into Rusty about six years later in Los Angeles. He was playing in a lounge up at Lake Arrowhead, 
was married and had kids. He wanted us to hire him on as road manager. We didn’t need one, but it’s 
hard to say no to him. He travelled with us for a few weeks and disrupted everything and spent most 
of our profits along the way. We gave him a couple of week’s severance pay and plane fare back to 
California, but we couldn’t stay mad at him. He was just being Rusty Diamond.

 12. Boy with The Be-Bop Glasses – Artists: The Dawn Breakers. (J. Blanchard)
 Coral Records/ Howell Studios, Buffalo N.Y. . 
 Piano- Jack Blanchard, bass, drums, and sax unknown.  Arranged and produced by Jack Blanchard. 
 Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI)1958.
Note:
At that time we didn’t have recording tape. We recorded through a needle onto an aluminum disc 
coated with some kind of black shellac. If somebody hit a wrong note you threw away the disc and 
started a new one. It was mono and there was no mix down. I had to sing and play the piano at the 
same time. When one of the Dawn Breakers took a solo part, he had to step into the mike. What 
you sang was what you got. The Dawn Breakers were: Jack Blanchard, Don Fronczak, Jim Warne, 
and Buddy Baker. 

 13. Hit Me One More Time – Artists: Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan. 
 (J. Blanchard)  (Unreleased) / Zodiac Records/ recorded Criteria Studios, Miami. 
 Organ-Misty Morgan, Rhythm guitar- John Abate, Sax-Paul McLaughlin as Paul Gale, Drums-
 Ronny Caban, Bass- Jackie Raye. Produced & arranged by Jack & Misty. Pub: Jack Blanchard 
 Songs (BMI)/ 1967.
Note:
This is a fun song, way uptempo, that gives the listener a chance to worry about what the meaning is.

 14. Hayride- Artist: Maryanne Mail. (Blanchard/ Fenner) 
 Misty Morgan as Maryanne Mail. Zodiac Records/ recorded Criteria Studios, Miami/ 
 Organ-Misty Morgan/ Rhythm guitar- John Abate/ Sax-Paul McLaughlin as Paul Gale/ Drums-
 Ronny Caban/ Bass- Jackie Raye/ Rhythm banjo-Henry Cook. Produced & arranged by Jack & Misty/
 Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI)/ circa 1965.
Note:
We couldn’t afford backup singers, so we rounded up three young wives from the neighborhood and 
talked them into doing it. They had never sung professionally, but we told them that was their charm.

 15. Cadillac- Artists: Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan. (J. Blanchard)
 - Darn records, Wayside records/ Woodland Studio, Nashville.
 Organ-Misty Morgan , Lead guitar- Billy Sanford, Steel guitar- Lloyd Green/ Piano- Hargus Robbins/
 Drums- unknown/ Acoustic Bass- Junior Huskey, Harmonica & Utility- Charlie McCoy/ Rhythm guitar-
 Bobby Thompson/ Backup vocals- The Anita Kerr Singers. Produced & arranged by Jack & Misty/
 Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI) 1968.
Note:
One of our goin’ home songs, built on the chords to Swannee River, that turned into a jam session 
featuring Misty and Charlie McCoy.
	
 16. Little Orphan Annie- Artist: Joel Mathis. (J. Blanchard)
 Countryside Records. Recorded at Music City Recorders, Nashville.
 Lead guitar- Billy Sanford/ Steel- Lloyd Green/ Piano- Hargus Robbins/Rhythm guitar- Bobby 
 Thompson/ Bass Henry Stzrelecki/ Drums- Larrie Londin/ String synth- Misty Morgan, Harmonica-
 Charlie McCoy/ Produced & arranged by Jack & Misty/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI) 1971.
Note:
Any time you hear a string synthesizer on our productions, it’s Misty’s Elka String Machine… one of 
her analog keyboards. I work mostly on the arrangements, and Misty is the boss of the mixdown, 
although we blur the line between these jobs. She has perfect pitch, and says she can hear like a mink.

 17. Midnight Greyhound . Artists: Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan
 (J. Blanchard)  -Darn records, Wayside records/ Woodland Studio, Nashville.
 Lead guitar- Billy Sanford, Steel guitar- Lloyd Green/ Piano- Hargus Robbins/Drums- unknown/
 Acoustic Bass- Junior Huskey, Harmonica & Utility- Charlie McCoy, Other keyboards- Don Tweedy/
 Rhythm guitar- Kelso Hurston/ Backup singers- The Anita Kerr Singers/ Produced & arranged by 
Jack & Misty/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI) 1967.
Note:
This song was on our first Nashville session as Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan.
We put all four of them on an EP (Extended Play) record. It looked like a 45 rpm single, but had 
two songs on each side. I think the grooves were made narrower. We used this to pitch ourselves 
and our material to the labels in Nashville.

 18. Here Today, Gone Tomorrow- Artist: Donel Austin. (J. Blanchard)
 Woodland Studios, Nashville. Earth Records. 
 Lead guitars- Billy Sanford, Chip Young/ Steel guitar- Lloyd Green/ Piano- Hargus Robbins/
 Harmonica- Charlie McCoy/ Rhythm guitar- Bobby Thompson/ Bass Henry Stzrelecki/ Drums-
 Larrie Londin/ The Leah Jane Singers. Produced & arranged by Jack & Misty/ Pub: Jack Blanchard
 Songs (BMI) 1973.
Note:
Donel Austin was the lead singer and front man with the Rockin’ Impallas, an R&B band that had a 
nightly radio show from a busy Miami nightspot,  the King o’ Hearts Club. They advertised in the 
Miami Herald for a union bass player. I was a keyboard guy and not a union member, but I went 
down there and auditioned anyway. At that time there was a popular attachment called a Lowrey 
Organo that turned a piano into an organ, so I could play bass lines with my left hand and backup 
chords and solos with my right. They got bass and organ for the price of one, and I worked there 
six months before the union noticed me. They had me join so they could keep an eye on me, they said.

 19. New World- Artists: The Jack Blanchard Group (Steve Fenner/Jack Blanchard) Label- Zodiac 
 Records/ recorded Criteria Studios, Miami/ Organ-Misty Morgan, Guitars- Doug Tarrant as Doug Wayne/
 Rhythm guitar- John Abate/ Drums- Ronny Caban/ Bass- Jackie Raye/ Back up vocals- Jack & Misty/
 Produced & arranged by Jack Blanchard/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI)/ Year circa 1965.
Note:
We’ve always liked this track, but it was neglected by being the flip side of Gemini. It was one of 
those days when the music and musicians all seemed to come together just right. We took it home 
and listened to it about a hundred times on our mono hi-fi set. New World and Strange New World
have the same basic instrumental tracks. Same with Gemini and Runaway. We were broke in Miami
and trying to figure out how to make a recording. We had the two instrumentals, so I wrote completely
different melodies, that would fit over the older tracks, and then put lyrics to them. We took our month's
rent money and booked the studio to record the vocals over the tracks. Steve Fenner, my co-writer on
Gemini and New World, kept the masters in his home safe. (He was a Cadillac salesman with a talent for
composing ragtime melodies, but he had the money to record us, so I re-wrote his melodies and
altered the whole feeling to make Gemini and New World.) Steve agreed to bring the masters
(3-track tape in those days) to the studio for us to record. Misty sang one of the two songs, and
was ready to do the second one. We had also hired a union flute player who was standing by,
but Steve Fenner and the masters were nowhere to be found. The studio clock was ticking
away our money, while I made several frantic phone calls, and finally located Fenner at the Cadillac
dealership, on the other side of town. He said he thought we were doing just one song, and
came back in 30 or 40 minutes. It was no big thing to him because he had lots of money, but
to us it was a couple of weeks salary. 

 20. Runaway- Artists: Jacqueline Hyde and the Moonfolk.  (Steve Fenner/Jack Blanchard)
 Zodiac Records/ recorded Criteria Studios, Miami. Lead vocal- Misty Morgan as Jacqueline Hyde.
 Organ-Misty Morgan, Lead guitars- Doug Tarrant as Doug Wayne/ Rhythm guitar- John Abate/
 Drums- Ronny Caban/ Bass- Jackie Raye/ Back up vocals- Jack & Misty/ Produced & arranged by
 Jack & Misty/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI)/ 1965.
Note:
This was to be recorded right after Strange New World, but as you know Steve Fenner had mistakenly
taken off with the background master.

 21. The King Of Hearts Artist: Jackie Blanchard and The Rockin’ Impallas. (Jackie Blanchard)
 Frank Linale's Studio, Miami, Florida. Mida Records.
 Guitar & bass- Doug Tarrant/ Drums- Frank Kennedy/ Sax- Angie Gillette/ Backup vocals-
 The Sensational Dellos/ Produced by Jackie Blanchard/ Pub.: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI). 1960.
Note:
I was working at Miami’s King o’ Hearts Club with Donel Austin and the Rockin’ Impallas, and I was 
always looking for a way to make a record. Donel had a couple of singles out that the club owner 
paid for. The owner’s name was Johnny, so I wrote this song with the lyric “Johnny was the King 
o’ Hearts”. He liked the idea of having his name and club name on a record, so he sprang for the 
session, which must have cost about a hundred bucks. A win-win situation.

 22. Journey’s End- Artists: Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan (J. Blanchard)
 Zodiac Records/ recorded Criteria Studios, Miami/ (Unreleased)
 Organ-Misty Morgan/ Harmonica- Paul McLaughlin/ Rhythm guitar- John Abate/ Drums- Ronny Caban/
 Bass- Jackie Raye/ Back up vocals- Jack & Misty/ Produced & arranged by Jack & Misty. Pub: Jack
 Blanchard Songs (BMI)/ 1967.	
Note:
A little travelling music. The idea of going home is a theme that runs through a lot of our songs, 
probably because Misty and I both left our home town, Buffalo, and went out on our own in our teens. 
We didn’t know each other in Buffalo, and didn’t meet until we were playing lounge piano about a block 
from each other in Hollywood, Florida.
	
 23. Monkey See Monkey Do – Artist: Hank Malcolm (J. Blanchard)
 Starday Studios, Nashville. Stop Records.
 Lead guitar- Jerry Shook/ Steel guitar- Pete Drake/ rhythm guitar- Tommy Hill/Piano- Jerry Smith,
 Bass- Junior Huskey/ Drums- Willy Ackerman/Backup vocals- The Hardin Trio. Produced & arranged
 by Jack Blanchard/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI)/1972.
Note:
This was the only song that Ray Stevens liked off the session we did with Mary Turn Around and 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. He seemed to like Brad, but he acted like he thought I was Brad's
lawyer or manager or something. We were trying to place the session with his Monument Records 
label. He said to me, "What will you do with this if we don't take it?" I said, "We'll probably put it on
our own little label and try to promote it." He said, "Maybe that would be best." Very "cool". Later
in our life he was nicer to us.
	
 24. The Love Habit- Artists: Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan (J. Blanchard)
 (Unreleased) Studio: The Music Mill, Muscle Shoals, Alabama/
 Lap Steel- Jack Blanchard/ Talking synth- Misty Morgan/ Drums- Roger Clark/Guitar- Kenny Bell/
 other musicians unknown/ Produced & arranged by Jack & Misty/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI)
 1973.
Note:
On this track Misty plays the “yucka-yucka” solo on an Arp synthesizer she connected to some kind 
of talking effect, and I get a chance to play my 1934 Rickenbacher Bakelite lap steel guitar. Misty 
used up to six stacked keyboards on stage. She somehow got sounds out of them that they weren’t 
designed to do. She even found a way to bend notes on a Hohner Clavinet!
Misty had these keyboards and effects:
Lowrey tube organ with bells, Wurlitzer tube organ, Univox Organizer with Leslie rotating speakers,
Arp Pro-Soloist synth, Arp DG-X synth, Vox and Farfisa organs, Wurlitzer and Rhodes electric pianos,
Elka String Machine, Boss analog echo, a fancy tape echo with five tape heads (brand unknown)
[Webmeister notes: I think it was called Echoplex], Small Stone pedal effect, a Wurlitzer Keyboard
Bass, a Rock-Si-Chord keyboard, a talking effect by Lowrey, a Hohner Clavinet, and other stuff.
She gave the Wurlitzer and Lowrey organs the "pop" attack of a Hammond by doing something with
the wiring. She bent notes on the Clavinet to get Les Paul's note bending, by working the knobs on the 
Boss echo or tape echo.
Once we had to call an exterminator to get a squirrel's nest out of her organ.
How many girls can say that?
	
 25. I'm Feelin’ A Change in My Life Artist: Donel Austin. (Skip Rogers) 
 Woodland Studios, Nashville/ MSK Records.
 Lead guitars- Billy Sanford, Chip Young/ Steel guitar- Lloyd Green/ Piano- Hargus Robbins/ Harmonica-
 Charlie McCoy/ Rhythm guitar- Bobby Thompson/ Bass Henry Stzrelecki/ Drums- Larrie Londin/ Backup
 singers- The Leah Jane Singers/ Pub: NA. Produced & arranged by Jack & Misty.1973.
Note:
Skip Rogers was a young songwriter with a lot of promise. He spent time at our house, and we tried 
to do what we could to help him in the music business. He never got to achieve his potential because 
he died in his mid-twenties. We heard that he was killed by a frying pan to the head, in a domestic 
argument. We all had fun recording this song, and we dedicate it to him.

 26. The Look Of Nothing- Artist: Tom Carlile (J. Blanchard) 
 Mercury Studios, Nashville/ (Unreleased)
 Lead guitar- Billy Sanford/ Steel- Lloyd Green/ Piano- Hargus Robbins/Rhythm guitar- Bobby Thompson/
 Bass- Henry Stzrelecki/ Drums- Larrie Londin/ Harmonica- Charlie McCoy/ Produced & arranged by Jack
 & Misty/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI) 1974.
Note:
When we moved from Miami to Orlando, it seems that all the other musicians we knew had the same 
idea. Tom Carlile was one of them. Tom usually had a good sized show band, and played around Orlando 
and Las Vegas doing an Elvis type show, without actually being an Elvis imitator. He looked good in the 
white bellbottom suits. Our friend Brad Wolfe also had that kind of a show band for a while, playing 
Vegas and Orlando.

 27. Somewhere In Virginia in The Rain (Disco Version).
 Artists: Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan (J. Blanchard)  United Artists Records/ Autumn Hill Records.
 Studio: The Music Mill, Muscle Shoals, Alabama.
 Steel guitar-Lloyd Green/ Drums- Roger Clark/ Lead Guitar- Kenny Bell/ The Muscle Shoals Singers/
 other musicians unknown/ Produced & arranged by Jack & Misty/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI)
 1974.	
Note:
This is a later experiment with a song that was big for us. The original had a Shag or Beach Music 
shuffle, but this disco rhythm gives a different feeling. We always like to try new stuff.

 28. Don’t It Look Like Georgia- Artist: Tom Carlile (Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan) 
 Mercury Studios, Nashville/  Aragon records.
 Lead guitar- Billy Sanford/ Steel- Lloyd Green/ Piano- Hargus Robbins/Rhythm guitar- Bobby Thompson/
 Bass Henry Stzrelecki/ Drums- Larrie Londin/ Harmonica- Charlie McCoy/ Produced & arranged by Jack
 & Misty/ Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI) 1974.
Note:
This song has been recorded by several fine artists. It was hard to choose the one for this album.

 29. Dance of the Living Dead Chickens. Artist: Jack Blanchard. (J. Blanchard)
 (Demo) Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI) (Unreleased) 1993.
Note:
One of our favorite classic horror movies was Night of the Living Dead…the original with Kevin McCarthy.
So why not living dead chickens? Chickens are a lot like people…only shorter.

 30. A Weird Little Christmas. Artist: Jack Blanchard. (J. Blanchard)
 (Unreleased) Pub: Jack Blanchard Songs (BMI). 2004.
Note: 
This little gem was actually inspired by a true life experience we had on the road one Christmas. 
I had written a serious essay about it. Many years later I bought a hand-held note taker that records 
on tiny microcassettes. The idea was to carry it in my shirt pocket and speak song and story ideas 
into it. I got tired of it after about two days but I kept it on my desk. One late night, for no apparent 
reason, I picked up the recorder and started adlibbing an odd parody of our Christmas adventure. 
Misty was in the next room, and she can be heard laughing in the background.

Jack Blanchard 2008
A note on sound quality: The music on this disc has been rescued from the clutches of Lady Thyme. The original mastering sources range from excellent quality masters and studio acetates to rare and battered 45s and even one song from a dict-a-phone cassette. Accordingly the audio quality varies significantly. Our restoration technicians really got their lab coats dirty on this one. But never forget it's about the music and the history associated with it. So, are you a Hi-Fi nerd or a music lover? Click here to read Greg Adams's liner notes!

 

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